Tag: seafood

Mussels Sicilian Style

(from The American Cancer Society Cookbook)

For a great dinner that is as delicious as it is easy to prepare, try this mussel recipe. There tasty shellfish are affordable for those on a budget, and I recommend buying cultured mussels as they are much easier to clean and are meatier than those from the wild. Be sure that all the mussel shells are closed when you buy them, and cook them very soon after purchase as fresh mussels are far superior in taste than those which might not be quite so fresh.

As an added bonus, mussels are a great source of lean protein!

Nutrition

  • serves 2
  • 304 calories
  • 21g carbs
  • 7.3g fat
  • 29.3g protein

Ingredients

  • 2 pounds fresh mussels (about 36)
  • 1 tsp olive oil
  • 1 small onion, finely chopped
  • 1 large clove garlic, finely chopped
  • pinch each; dried thyme and oregano
  • 1 (14 ounce) canned tomatoes, diced
  • 1/4 cup dry white wine
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley
  1. Scrub mussels under cold water and pull off hairy beards.
  2. In a large, heavy saucepan, heat oil over medium heat; add onion and garlic and then cook for 2 to 3 minutes or until tender.
  3. Stir in thyme and oregano; add tomatoes. Bring to a boil and simmer for about 2 minutes to reduce liquid. Add wine and return to a boil.
  4. Add mussels; cover and cook for 5 minutes or until shells open and mussels are cooked. Sprinkle with parsley.
  5. Ladle mussels into large soup bowls, spooning tomato mixture over them. Eat with a fork and a spoon – the fork to remove the mussels from their shells and the spoon for the hearty broth.
Advertisements

Shrimp Wrapped with Snow Peas

(Recipe from The American Cancer Society Cookbook)

Who does not love shrimp? I have to say it is one of my favorite sea foods and thankfully is fairly inexpensive at about $8.00 US per pound, give or take a dollar or so. This colorful, delicious hors d’oeuvre is quite easy to prepare. If you find that you have more snow peas than you need, you can serve them with a dip or spread, or spit them down the middle and fill with cottage cheese. You will find this dish to be low in fat and calories.

Nutrition

  • 4 servings
  • 92 calories
  • 3.1 grams carbs
  • 1.1 grams fat
  • 15.8 grams protein

Ingredients

  • 4 cups water
  • 1 thick slice of onion
  • 1 clove garlic, halved
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 2 stalks celery with leaves
  • 1 pound large raw shrimp in shells, about 18
  • 1/4 pound snow peas
  1. In a large saucepan, combine water, onion, garlic, bay leaf and celery; bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 5 minutes; add shrimp and simmer, uncovered for 3 to 5 minutes or until shrimp have turned pink. Drain immediately and chill under cold water. Remove shell and de-vein each shrimp.
  2. Trim snow peas and blanch in boiling water for 2 minutes or just until the peas are pliable. Drain and plunge into a bowl of ice water to prevent further cooking and to set color. Drain.
  3. Wrap a snow pea around each shrimp and secure with toothpicks.  Arrange on a serving plate and garnish with lettuce, celery and carrot sticks. Cover and refrigerate until serving time.

There has been plenty of study over enough years that it is quite factual that many cancers arise in our body’s as a direct result of our dietary habits. As we have done with diabetes by writing numerous articles on the subject and giving you a wide variety of diabetic friendly recipes, it is our intent to do the same in regards to cancer. We are not doctors, and do not pretend to be so, therefore we are in no way, shape or form attempting to imply we have any type of cures. We simply will be providing recipes that can help reduce your risk of getting certain types of cancer in the first place.